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DVD audio subs

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#1 arrbee99 OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 08:00 PM

I realise this isn't really an Emby thing, but while I've been trying to replace my DVDs with Blurays, there's still quite a few to go, and some will no doubt be staying put.

 

So, in the meantime and in order to save a bit of space, does anyone know of a program that'll remove surplus audio and video tracks from something like this...

 

5a063d46cd025_EmbyDVDremovesubs.jpg

 

...without actually going to the trouble of compressing / handbraking the file ? Thanks.



#2 Doofus OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 08:32 PM

DVD structures suck. The movie is broken into parts. To do what you want, you'd have to unpack and repack each one. Just use makemkv and rip them, then you can do whatever you want.

#3 Deathsquirrel OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 08:42 PM

DVD structures suck. The movie is broken into parts. To do what you want, you'd have to unpack and repack each one. Just use makemkv and rip them, then you can do whatever you want.

 

The screenshot is already a MKV.

 

Use mkvtoolnix, it can easily drop those I needed elements.


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#4 arrbee99 OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 08:43 PM

Seeing as they're already ripped, are you suggesting ripping again but deleting tracks while ripping ? If so would that be better than using this MKVToolNix / MKVMerge stuff I've been reading about ?



#5 Doofus OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 08:48 PM

Lol... Sorry. I'm on my phone, the picture is too small to read. You said DVD, but apparently they aren't :D

Edited by Doofus, 10 November 2017 - 08:48 PM.


#6 Doofus OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 08:50 PM

Yes, use mkvtoolnix. It really easy and quick. Just load it up deselect what you don't want...and bingo!

#7 arrbee99 OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 08:55 PM

Hokey dokey. Thanks. Sounds so easy even I should be able to manage it  :)



#8 Doofus OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 09:05 PM

It will write a new file, not replace the existing. I should mention that.

#9 arrbee99 OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 09:12 PM

For me, that sounds like a valuable safeguard...



#10 Waldonnis OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 11:00 PM

I'll second the mkvtoolnix suggestion.  It's a VERY handy set of tools and even comes with a nice GUI that makes common operations very easy to do.  The package and GUI also have editors for chapters and headers, so you can manipulate the metadata if you want as well (selecting default tracks, setting/fixing language coding, naming tracks, etc.).  I use it a ton (both the command line binaries for my scripts and the GUI) and I can't even estimate how much time it's saved me compared to remuxing with ffmpeg for simple header changes.



#11 arrbee99 OFFLINE  

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 11:28 PM

Thanks, I've given it a go with one mkv and was easy, even for me.

 

You wouldn't happen to know if it'll do batches (preferably without any command line type stuff) somehow ? Have about 170 DVDs to do, removing everything except English sound tracks (but keeping all the English ones there, like 5.1 plus stereo) and just keeping whichever subtitles are needed for the non-English bits in English language movies.



#12 Waldonnis OFFLINE  

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 01:24 AM

I don't think so, at least not without scripting it using the command line.  It's not really made to do more than one thing at a time, much like most similar video utilities, and the GUI is really designed to present the functionality of the command line binaries (which are all single-task).  You could use the job queue to queue up a bunch of them, then just run the entire queue at once overnight, but I don't think there's a way to do autoselection and execution.  I could be wrong, though.  I never used an option file, so that may be something to look into.  I mostly script repetitive tasks and only use the GUI for single files, so it's something I never really thought about.

 

Having had to go through everything in my libraries at one point to add remixed AAC stereo tracks, my best advice is to take your time and work on a few per day.  In my case, it was mostly clean-up work that I wasn't in a huge rush to finish, so I just did a few files per day (well, a few for me, which is 20-30).  Also, definitely check your new output files before replacing the old ones to make sure you didn't forget anything or included the wrong audio track or subtitle stream.  With mkvtoolnix, you can easily correct mistakes/omissions, but better to do that before deleting the old file rather than having to go back to the source because you added a descriptive audio track rather than the main soundtrack accidentally (been there, done that).



#13 arrbee99 OFFLINE  

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 04:36 PM

Thanks for the info. I'll probably end up doing them one at a time, though I have been looking around a bit and come across stuff like this thread  https://forum.videoh...-MKV-container¬†which has scripts in various languages, just not sure if I'm brave enough to try them out, especially as some of the fancier ones replace the original, which I agree is best not to do.



#14 Waldonnis OFFLINE  

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 10:55 PM

Thanks for the info. I'll probably end up doing them one at a time, though I have been looking around a bit and come across stuff like this thread  https://forum.videoh...-MKV-container¬†which has scripts in various languages, just not sure if I'm brave enough to try them out, especially as some of the fancier ones replace the original, which I agree is best not to do.

 

Some nice scripts in there, and some effort went into them.  Parsing output in batch files is just too messy for me (I use bash, perl, python, and PowerShell mostly), so I applaud them for enduring that pain  :P   I'd assume most are fine with replacing files simply for storage reasons - if they don't have ample free disc space, they probably couldn't afford to take up a ton more with the new output files along with the originals.

 

Looking over them, it should be easy enough to identify and delete or comment out the lines that delete/replace the originals if you wanted to do that.  Personally, I'd do them manually and take the opportunity to make your files' tracks more consistent to allow for scripted operations in the future (should you need to do so).  For instance, all of mine have the native language AAC stereo mix as the first track, with the second track being the lossless or surround version, followed by any number of commentary tracks.  This let me replace the AAC track easily when I needed to do so since I could always count on it being first.  I did have a few that needed manual intervention (additional translation dubs, mostly), but those were few and easily found.

 

You could also add metadata to denote what the tracks are (e.g. "Director Commentary" for an audio track or "English Forced" for a forced sub), making it easier to pick what you want to see/hear during playback (Emby does show these labels in the clients).  Definitely explore MKVToolNix's interface a bit - there's a lot in there that can be very useful.







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