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Please do some Massive improvements to Roku app now that Roku bug is fixed

v7.5 Roku 4 Roku app direct play Native formats

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#21 Luke OFFLINE  

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 10:07 PM

We are building an all-new Roku app with an all-new design and a new set of capabilities.


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#22 jayw654 OFFLINE  

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 04:32 AM

It is not a question of power, but rather that the SOCs in the newer models and the older Roku 4 have a hardware decoder for HEVC. If you removed the decoders, it's likely that none of the models could support decoding 4k HEVC in real time (many modern desktop processors would struggle as well, incidentally). The actual CPU cores frequently do little more than demuxing, handle i/o and buffering, and maybe some audio decoding during playback.

Also, not sure what "nicer with less data" means. At fixed (and low) bitrates, HEVC can deliver better quality for 4k source material compared to h.264, but won't always. It really depends on the encoder, settings, and source material. Just because "265>264" doesn't mean that HEVC is always better quality. Try preserving film grain or some motion blur effects using both codecs and you'll definitely see why I take issue with such blanket assumptions (hint: h.264 is often better for this, even with 4k sources). I won't argue about efficiency of the codec itself, as it is just a fact that HEVC is clearly more efficient at storing larger format video data (it was designed to be so).

Sorry to derail, but I see too many people that just assume one codec exists that's the best at everything. Codec selection depends on so many factors that it's never that easy, and even then, encoder choice/settings can make a huge difference. It's also why we have so many codecs (even VP8/9 have their strengths)

Fair enough but as a streaming format h.265 is the better codec but if space and bandwidth isn't and issue then you are probably right its a dilemma based on needs with strengths and weaknesses but my main concern is streaming for the best quality with the least amount of data. VP9 would be an answer but it has its own issues so I decided to stay away from it as encoding with it is a pain and the output looks dull due to its compression but my test was based on 9mbps. However, one thing I know that if I need to convert a movie quick HEVC is better as it is gpu and now cpu accelerated which give h.265 a hell of an edge.


Edited by jayw654, 18 November 2016 - 01:32 PM.


#23 jayw654 OFFLINE  

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 03:32 PM

Also read the following from Wikipedia as it states that H.265 is better designed to handle motion.,

 

High Efficiency Video Coding
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), also known as H.265 and MPEG-H Part 2, is a video compression standard, one of several potential successors to the widely used AVC (H.264 or MPEG-4 Part 10). In comparison to AVC, HEVC offers about double the data compression ratio at the same level of video quality, or substantially improved video quality at the same bit rate. It supports resolutions up to 8192×4320, including 8K UHD.

In most ways, HEVC is an extension of the concepts in H.264/MPEG-4 AVC. Both work by comparing different parts of a frame of video to find areas that are redundant, both within a single frame as well as subsequent frames. These redundant areas are then replaced with a short description instead of the original pixels. The primary changes for HEVC include the expansion of the pattern comparison and difference-coding areas from 16×16 pixel to sizes up to 64×64, improved variable-block-size segmentation, improved "intra" prediction within the same picture, improved motion vector prediction and motion region merging, improved motion compensation filtering, and an additional filtering step called sample-adaptive offset filtering. Effective use of these improvements requires much more signal processing capability for compressing the video, but has less impact on the amount of computation needed for decompression.

HEVC was developed by the JCT-VC organization, a collaboration between the ISO/IEC MPEG and ITU-T VCEG. The ISO/IEC group refers to it as MPEG-H Part 2 and the ITU-T as H.265. The first version of HEVC was completed in January 2013 and published in June 2013. The second version was completed and approved in 2014 and published in early 2015. Additional 3D-HEVC extensions for 3D video were completed in early 2015. Further extensions remain in development for completion in early 2016, covering video containing rendered graphics, text, or animation as well as (or instead of) camera-captured video scenes.

HEVC is protected by patents owned by various parties. Use of HEVC technologies requires the payment of royalties to licensors of HEVC patents, such as MPEG LA, HEVC Advance, and Technicolor SA. The licensing fees are many times higher than the fees for AVC. The problematic licensing situation is one of the main reasons HEVC adoption has been very low on the web and is why some of the largest tech companies (Amazon, AMD, ARM, Cisco, Google, Intel, Microsoft, Mozilla, Netflix, NVIDIA and more) have joined the Alliance for Open Media,[1] which aims to deploy the royalty-free alternative codec AV1 in 2017.

 

 

Now read about the internet replacement to both HEVC and VP9:

 

AOMedia Video 1 (AV1) is an open, royalty-free video coding format designed for video transmissions over the Internet. It is being developed by the Alliance for Open Media (AOMedia), a consortium of leading firms from the semiconductor industry, video on demand providers, and web browser developers, founded in 2015. It is the primary contender for standardisation by the video standard working group NetVC of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).[1] The group has put together a list of criteria to be met by the new video standard.[2] It is meant to replace Google's VP9 and compete with HEVC/H.265 from the Moving Picture Experts Group.

AV1 can be used together with the audio format Opus in a future version of the WebM format for HTML5 web video and WebRTC.

 

Opus audio combined with a browser friendly Video web codec that is royalty free, its a match made in heaven. let's hope the encoding can be accelerate. Yes, I know the acceleration will not happen the moment its released but hopefully a couple years later it will be possible.



#24 CBers OFFLINE  

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 05:07 AM

We are building an all-new Roku app with an all-new design and a new set of capabilities.

 

Will the new app be available to sideload onto the NOW TV boxes please ??



#25 ebr OFFLINE  

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 10:26 AM

Will the new app be available to sideload onto the NOW TV boxes please ??

 

Possibly, but I cannot promise that just yet.


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#26 denz OFFLINE  

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 10:28 AM

Hopefully it won't be a dark theme but a lighter theme something like emby for Apple tv.

#27 ebr OFFLINE  

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 10:31 AM

Hopefully it won't be a dark theme but a lighter theme something like emby for Apple tv.

 

Possibly in the future but the first iteration will be much like all other channels on these devices.  The only reason the Apple TV is different is because the default presentation on the device itself is that way.  But, even Apple realized that most people prefer darker themes on large screens in dark rooms so they added a dark option in iOS 10 (our app always had a dark option).



#28 CBers OFFLINE  

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 10:33 AM

Possibly, but I cannot promise that just yet.

 

No problem, just asking :)



#29 denz OFFLINE  

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Posted 22 November 2016 - 12:56 AM

Possibly in the future but the first iteration will be much like all other channels on these devices.  The only reason the Apple TV is different is because the default presentation on the device itself is that way.  But, even Apple realized that most people prefer darker themes on large screens in dark rooms so they added a dark option in iOS 10 (our app always had a dark option).

 

I love the lighter themes but that is probable because I just got used to them I am very long time user of WMC and love that blue colour and on all my Rpi I use a lighter Kodi skin so emby is the odd one out. Where my TV's are they are all in well lit rooms. Anyway looking forward to the new app.



#30 catskinsox OFFLINE  

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Posted 23 November 2016 - 02:52 AM

We are building an all-new Roku app with an all-new design and a new set of capabilities.

Thanks for the hard work.  I don't suppose there is any ballpark ETA?  



#31 denz OFFLINE  

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Posted 23 November 2016 - 10:20 AM

Just want to ask anyone else with this issues if a watch something it starts reasonable quickly than i get loading please wait and takes very long for something to start playing than again it will get stuck with loading please wait. Live tv also doesnt work even with the new roku update I will wait for the new app and see if there is improvements. Since roku doesnt have mpeg2 there is not much use unless i get a faster computer for transcoding.

#32 Luke OFFLINE  

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Posted 23 November 2016 - 12:16 PM

Roku TV devices support mpeg2.

#33 ebr OFFLINE  

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Posted 23 November 2016 - 12:23 PM

Since the 7.5 firmware update, I have also noticed that some videos will start for a second and then you get the "Loading" again until it is truly ready to play.  I think maybe they are starting playback before the buffer has really filled to a proper capacity.  There aren't any documented ways to control this but we'll look into it.

 

The live TV problem is fixed by a subsequent Roku firmware update (7.5.4099).



#34 Luke OFFLINE  

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Posted 23 November 2016 - 12:49 PM

It's not always an Emby problem.

#35 Luke OFFLINE  

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 02:44 PM

If you'd like to try a preview of the new Roku app you can do so here:

 

https://emby.media/c...ic-preview-beta

 

Please make sure to read the disclaimers. Thanks and enjoy !







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: v7.5, Roku 4, Roku app, direct play, Native formats

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