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Windows media player can't play my itunes movie


Eliene
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I use Windows media player on my Windows 7 platform computer, but it fails to recognize itunes movie I add, how can i fix it?

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Deathsquirrel

Unless you strip off the drm I doubt you can play itunes movies in WMP or much that isnt itunes or apple hardware.

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Unless you strip off the drm I doubt you can play itunes movies in WMP or much that isnt itunes or apple hardware.

strip off the drm? what is drm? how to just remove it? I purchased the itunes movie, can't I just play it on my computer?

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strip off the drm? what is drm? how to just remove it? I purchased the itunes movie, can't I just play it on my computer?

 

Evil Apple says no.....

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strip off the drm? what is drm? how to just remove it? I purchased the itunes movie, can't I just play it on my computer?

 

DRM is Digital Rights Management

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_rights_management

 

In a nutshell it allows content creators to limit the playback of their content to only specific machines or circumstances. So you own the file but you may only use it on a select number of devices, to play it on more devices you would need to de-authorize one device and then authorize another.

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DRM is Digital Rights Management

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_rights_management

 

In a nutshell it allows content creators to limit the playback of their content to only specific machines or circumstances. So you own the file but you may only use it on a select number of devices, to play it on more devices you would need to de-authorize one device and then authorize another.

 

 

Actually, you don't own the file.  You bought a limited license to play back that content on whatever devices and at whatever times the company that sold you that license (Apple) sees fit.

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Actually, you don't own the file.  You bought a limited license to play back that content on whatever devices and at whatever times the company that sold you that license (Apple) sees fit.

 

Even worse! So basically don't get DRM files ever :P

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Deathsquirrel

This is why I don't buy movies digitally.  You don't own them.  I buy on disc and rip my discs.  Sure, I have to store the discs, but I recycle the packaging and shove the disc in a binder.  2000 discs are currently taking up about 3 feet of a shelf at the top of a closet in the guest room.  That's acceptable to me.

 

There are tools out there to strip DRM from itunes files though.  I can't recommend one as I'm not a user but google it and you'll get some ideas I'm sure.

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This is why I don't buy movies digitally.  You don't own them.  I buy on disc and rip my discs.  Sure, I have to store the discs, but I recycle the packaging and shove the disc in a binder.  2000 discs are currently taking up about 3 feet of a shelf at the top of a closet in the guest room.  That's acceptable to me.

 

There are tools out there to strip DRM from itunes files though.  I can't recommend one as I'm not a user but google it and you'll get some ideas I'm sure.

 

Not that it really matters but you don't own the content when you buy a disc either.  You own the physical media but the contents of the disc are still owned by the producer and you have only bought a license to use it in the manner specified by that producer.  This is the same of all software (which media technically is).

 

That form of media also contains DRM it is just that the tools you use to rip it also defeats the copy protection.  So, your method is basically identical to getting the files digitally and then running a tool to strip the DRM - it is just easier because there are more/easier tools to do it.

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Deathsquirrel

Not that it really matters but you don't own the content when you buy a disc either.  You own the physical media but the contents of the disc are still owned by the producer and you have only bought a license to use it in the manner specified by that producer.  This is the same of all software (which media technically is).

 

That form of media also contains DRM it is just that the tools you use to rip it also defeats the copy protection.  So, your method is basically identical to getting the files digitally and then running a tool to strip the DRM - it is just easier because there are more/easier tools to do it.

 

Mostly true except that with a disc you don't buy a license because there is no licensing agreement.  You just buy that physical piece of media that can be used for playback of whatever is on said disc.   Your access to a digital file can be revoked because there is an agreement.  Amazon has reached onto people's kindles and removed books they disapprove of, for example.

 

On the other hand not only do I get a physical disc that cant be revoked, I get to decide exactly what audio and video formats to use in my digital copy of that disc.

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The iTunes media player and associated content library has become one of the most popular applications for purchasing, storing, and creating playlists of both audio and video content on the marketplace. For iTunes users who use the media application on a computer that has the Windows operating system installed, a common issue that arises is figuring out how to convert iTunes to Windows Media Player format. Unfortunately, there is not a “one click” solution to this issue since each application relies on a native format that is not cross-compatible with the other program. As a result, at the time of this writing it is necessary to export iTunes media to a common format that Windows Media Player is capable of reading such as WMV, MP3. 

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Mostly true except that with a disc you don't buy a license because there is no licensing agreement.  You just buy that physical piece of media that can be used for playback of whatever is on said disc.   Your access to a digital file can be revoked because there is an agreement.  Amazon has reached onto people's kindles and removed books they disapprove of, for example.

 

On the other hand not only do I get a physical disc that cant be revoked, I get to decide exactly what audio and video formats to use in my digital copy of that disc.

So, your both kinda right and kinda wrong. What applies to a physical disc (as opposed to a digital file, although I would presume that digital files will follow suit in the long run but we haven't gotten there) is the First Sale doctrine.  The First Sale doctrine basically allows you to do whatever you want to a physical medium of copyrighted work sell it, rent it, keep it, burn it, banish it, etc....think Red Box, however not copy it or make backups, and also doesn't apply to digital copies (at least in the U.S., Europe has a different perspective).  The actual copies themselves are then permissible by case law (Sony Corp. of America v. Universal City Studios, Inc or the betamax case) which basically states that its fair use to make personal copies of copyrighted content (also the basis for DVR recordings in case you were interested), regardless of the purpose (as long as its for personal benefit...no commercial uses).

 

Just a little law on a Thursday morning!

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Deathsquirrel

So, your both kinda right and kinda wrong. What applies to a physical disc (as opposed to a digital file, although I would presume that digital files will follow suit in the long run but we haven't gotten there) is the First Sale doctrine.  The First Sale doctrine basically allows you to do whatever you want to a physical medium of copyrighted work sell it, rent it, keep it, burn it, banish it, etc....think Red Box, however not copy it or make backups, and also doesn't apply to digital copies (at least in the U.S., Europe has a different perspective).  The actual copies themselves are then permissible by case law (Sony Corp. of America v. Universal City Studios, Inc or the betamax case) which basically states that its fair use to make personal copies of copyrighted content (also the basis for DVR recordings in case you were interested), regardless of the purpose (as long as its for personal benefit...no commercial uses).

 

Just a little law on a Thursday morning!

 

Yup but that fair use copying conflicts with DMCA restrictions on bypassing encryption....and as far as I'm aware courts haven't yet decided which one wins for the purpose of format shifting or backing up video discs.

 

On the other hand, since backing up and not sharing your own discs isn't something the rights holder can ever find out about, it's probably not a legal gray area worth worrying about ;)

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Yup but that fair use copying conflicts with DMCA restrictions on bypassing encryption....and as far as I'm aware courts haven't yet decided which one wins for the purpose of format shifting or backing up video discs.

IANAL, but I read an article that the RIAA and MPAA both avoid going to court for cases that may determine the answer to this conflict. Didn't the Library of Congress say that format shifting was fine for a small subset (educational? preservation?) and didn't violate the DMCA?

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Koleckai Silvestri

IANAL, but I read an article that the RIAA and MPAA both avoid going to court for cases that may determine the answer to this conflict. Didn't the Library of Congress say that format shifting was fine for a small subset (educational? preservation?) and didn't violate the DMCA?

 

You can legally format shift as long as you don't break encryption. All discs (DVDs, Blurays, etc....) that ship digital media are encrypted. Both video and audio. What you do with that knowledge is your own personal choice though.

 

It is interesting that Sony pushed for the ability to format shift in order to sell Walkmans, VHS and Betamax recorders along with the media for those devices. The concept of Format Shifting has led to the rise of what is now the DVR industry. Today, Sony is the biggest proponents of DRM in the world. Actively working to prevent people from copying their Bluray discs though they have given up on CD and DVDs as dead technology. 

Edited by Koleckai Silvestri
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Koleckai Silvestri

There are ways to strip DRM off of iTunes media without breaking encryption. Actually most apps that feature this ability do it without worrying about the encryption. What they do is play the video via Quicktime and record that playback at the same time. You'll lose a lot of quality though.

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Deathsquirrel

IANAL, but I read an article that the RIAA and MPAA both avoid going to court for cases that may determine the answer to this conflict.

 

I don't expect to get an answer to the question any time soon.  Any case that tested it would be very dangerous for the plantiff.  They would somehow have to identify a person that is ripping discs for their own private use, keeping the discs around, and never sharing them.  Then they have to convince a jury that that person is a malicious criminal worthy of severe financial penalties.  I doubt they consider it worth their time considering that if they lost the ruling could easily undercut elements of the DMCA they want to use.

 

Far better to make copying a pain in the butt where they can and sue the life out of people sharing files.

Edited by Deathsquirrel
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  • 1 year later...
Guest asrequested

Just don't buy anything Apple, makes. It all sucks! They have proprietary restrictions on everything, as if they actually have anything worth protecting.

 

Just a little rant....carry on  :)

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